Presenting the Spring 2014 Patterns

Category: Featured Projects, New Stuff

We have been teasing you with peeks of the newest designs over the last several weeks and we are pleased to share the Spring 2014 pattern collection in its entirety with you in this blog post! This collection is fresh and light in Fino, Serena, Silk Blend and Maxima.  These patterns are available online through Ravelry, or visit your local yarn store to buy a print copy.

 TartaDulce de LecheBizcocho

 FlanRicardito

Heather Zoppetti, the featured designer for the Spring 2014 collection, knocked it out of the park with five designs shown above. The sweaters, shown from left to right, are Tarta, Dulce de Leche, and Bizcocho. Her accessory patterns are the Flan shawl (bottom left) and Ricardito cowl (bottom right).

Trufa shawlChurros

These additional designs are wonderful items to have as the weather fluctuates. Cast on Corrina Ferguson’s Trufa shawl (left) or the Churros scarf by Lisa R. Myers (center). The Membrillo cowl (right) is Angelia Robinson’s crochet contribution.

PastelitosAlfajor

Hats are perennial favorites. We’re pleased to share with you Pastelitos by Christine Marie Chen, left, and Alfajor by Lisa R. Myers, right.
HeladoGranita
Helado by Tanis Gray, left, pairs nicely with the sweater and cowl combination designed by E.J.Slayton in Granita, right.
Add them to your Pinterest boards, cast on and share your project progress with us in our Ravelry group or on our Facebook page! Let’s bring on Spring!

Fair Trade from Start to Finish (part 3)

Category: Fair Trade News & Topics, Featured Projects

Over the last few days we have introduced you to the artisans that create Wool Clasica, the people that bring the yarn to your yarn shops, and today you can meet the knitter and see the finished object!

This is Julie.

Julie

Julie is wearing the hat she made in her Beginners Knitting class, from the yarn Nicole had skeined and shelved.  (Pretty great for a beginner, huh?)

How do we know this is a skein that Lides spun and Ana dyed?

Julie's tag

Because Lides signed it.

This is what Manos del Uruguay stands for:  artisanal yarn, cooperatively produced and fairly traded. When you choose Manos del Uruguay yarn, you’re choosing yarn with a purpose! Thank you for your continued support. We hope you continue to work with and support Fair Trade products, like Manos del Uruguay yarns, throughout the year!

Fair Trade from Start to Finish (Part 2)

Category: Fair Trade News & Topics

In today’s post we are bringing you the second part of the story of Manos del Uruguay yarn. We started in the Manos Cooperative of Dragon where Wool Clasica is spun and dyed.

This is Collin.

collin

After Ana has dyed the yarn that Lides spun, it comes to the Fairmount Fibers warehouse in Philadelphia, where Collin unpacks it. He also repacks it for shipment to yarn shops all over the U.S.

 

This is Nicole.

Nic-skeins-copy

After Collin has repacked the yarn that Lides spun and Ana dyed, Nicole skeins it up and puts it on the shelf at Rosie’s Yarn Cellar. Here the yarn is ready to be selected for that special project. Check back for our next post, where you’ll see the knitter and finished object!

Fair Trade from Start to Finish

Category: Artisan Profiles, Fair Trade News & Topics

Fans of Manos del Urugay yarns might already know that with each purchased skein of Manos del Uruguay yarn you will be helping a woman to support her family. As we celebrate Fair Trade in February, we’d like to present the people who are behind the yarn and have signed the tag on the yarn you have selected and purchased for your project.

This is Lides.

Lides from Dragon

She is a member of the Manos cooperative at Dragon, where she spins Wool Clasica.

This is Ana.

Ana from Dragon

She is a member of the Manos cooperative at Dragon, where she dyes the yarn that Lides spun.

The Dragon Cooperative is located in Placido Rosas, Uruguay.

Map

Our next post will bring this yarn from Uruguay to Fairmount Fibers, LTD. the North American Distributor based in Philadelphia, PA.