Let’s get cozy with new knitting patterns in Manos del Uruguay yarns!

Category: Featured Projects, New Stuff

Autumn in North America starts in a few weeks, but you don’t have to wait for a calendar date to decide on a fall knitting project!  Manos del Uruguay yarns will keep you warm and cozy no matter what you knit. Here are our newest knitting patterns to keep you covered as the temperatures cool. 

Mari Chiba knit patterns in Manos del Uruguay yarns

The Fairmount Fibers team brings a beautiful pattern collection for the 2017 fall season. Mari Chiba is the featured designer of 6 pieces. Mari’s aim, inspired by Japanese fashion, was to create fun knits and indulge her cable obsession. Shown above, clockwise from the top left: Bonsall in Maxima, Dorrance in Franca, Jessup in Silk Blend, Ritner in Gloria, and Norwood cowl and hat in Franca.  

Hats, cowl, and fingerless mitts patterns to knit in Manos del Urugauy yarns

Accessories make great gifts, too – couldn’t everyone use a new hat, scarf, or mitts this year? The collection includes an assortment of unisex patterns including Ellet by Barbara Benson in Gloria (left), Cantrell Hat and Cowl by Sarah Solomon in Maxima (center top), Tasker by Christine Marie Chen in Maxima (right), and Gerritt, also by Christine in Gloria (center, bottom). 

Scarves and wraps to knit in Manos del Uruguay yarns

Scarves, wraps, and a capelet round out the accessories. Shown above, from left to right: Mifflin by Emma Welford in Maxima, McKean by Sara Solomon in Silk Blend, Ringgold (center top), Fitzwater (center bottom) and Sedgwick (Wrap, Cowl, and Scarf) all designs by Lisa R. Myers in Clara

New Sweater patterns to knit in Manos del Uruguay yarns

Finer-gauge sweaters include two designs by Melissa Leapman: Annin in Gloria and Latona in Silk Blend. In addition, Warnock by Sarah Solomon in Silk Blend and Winton by Ash Alberg in Milo all offer cozy and comfortable styles that are equally fun to knit and wear. 

With cooler temperatures on the horizon for much of the United States, will you start a sweater or layer on the accessories? Do you use Pinterest for planning? We have a dedicated pattern board for this collection on Pinterest from which you can pin! Share your projects and plans with us on your favorite social channel: Facebook, Instagram, or in the Ravelry group

Project Inspiration for Manos del Uruguay Serpentina

Category: Featured Projects, Yarn Features

In our previous post, we introduced you to Serpentina. This yarn is one of two new Manos del Uruguay yarns making its way to the stashes, hearts, needles, and hooks of our fans right now. When you see it on the shelves of your local yarn shop (click here to find one near you), keep these projects in mind for inspiration!

Project Inspiration for Serpentina

KnitterNinjaShar's Diagonal Ribbed Cowl in Serpentina   Nutmegknitter's One Good Turn crochet cowl in Serpentina

Pick up a skein of Serpentina and notice how soft and squishy it is – a natural choice for a one-skein project using an aran-weight yarn is a cowl. Shown above left is KnitterNinjaShar’s Diagonal Rib Cowl. Did you hear it discussed on the Yarniacs podcast Episode 147? Each skein has 142 yards, plenty for a crochet project! Nutmegknitter crocheted the One Good Turn cowl, above right, in just one morning.  

New Patterns for Serpentina

Serpentina Scarf by Lucinda Islesias   Fiber & Vine's Pattern    

We are looking forward to new patterns to support this yarn, the first of which is the Serpentina Scarf by Lucinda Iglesias, which calls for two skeins of Serpentina. The knitters at Fiber and Vine recently shared a sneak peek of a forthcoming pattern – check out those earflaps!

Follow us on and stay tuned to your favorite social channel for project inspiration in Manos del Uruguay Serpentina! You can find Manos del Uruguay Yarns on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, and Ravelry.

 

 

New Manos del Uruguay Yarn: Serpentina

Category: New Stuff, Yarn Features

New Manos del Uruguay Yarn: SerpentinaNew Manos del Uruguay Serpentina yarn on display at TNNA

The 2017 fall season is shaping up to be fabulous with all that is new from Manos del Uruguay! Today’s post introduces you to one of the new yarns, Serpentina. Handspun from handpainted merino wool tops, Serpentina is a truly artisanal product. Each skein is unique, and the colors are totally random — they will not stack or pool. The result is a delicate color twirling effect reminiscent of paper streamers (serpentina, in Spanish) thrown at South American Carnival parties. 

12 Colors of Serpentina

Manos del Uruguay Serpentina yarn colorways

Serpentina is an aran weight yarn with approximately 142 yards per skein. The squish factor is high making this yarn a great choice for cold weather items. Twelve colorways are available: (top row, left to right) Malala, Jane, Edith, Pina, Florence, Coco. Bottom row, left to right: Amelia, Gabriela, Frida, Petrona, Mother Teresa, and Marie.

Manos del Uruguay Serpentina colorway inspiration

Manos del Uruguay Serpentina yarn colorways are named in honor of influential women

Did you notice each colorway name is female? Influential, empowering women from around the globe and throughout the years including artists, activists, authors, and pioneers inspired the colors. Shown above are the honorees:(top row) Malala Yousafzai, Jane Austen, Edith Piaf, Pina Bausch; (middle row) Florence Nightingale, Coco Chanel, Amelia Earhart, Gabriela Mistral; (bottom row) Frida Kahlo, Petrona Viera, Mother Teresa, and Marie Curie
 

Have you already discovered this new yarn from Manos del Uruguay? Let us know your project plans on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, and Ravelry. Stay tuned for our next post spotlighting pattern and project suggestions to pair with Manos del Uruguay Serpentina

Use Up Your Yarn Leftovers

Category: Featured Projects

Knitters and crocheters may often hear about one-skein wonder projects which use up those single skeins of yarn. They can be appealing, but there is often a significant part of the skein remaining. Waste not! Here are a few ideas for small projects to use up your leftover lengths of Manos del Uruguay yarns

Projects you can make with a partial skein of Manos del Uruguay yarn

Try your hand at a new technique or maybe work up a project for gifting later to avoid that last-minute rush! Shown above, clockwise from top right: Rainbow’s Reward necklace using 20-25 yards of Serena, Phoebe Pig using 100 yards of Maxima, Diamonds Hat using Wool Clasica in the contrasting colorwork, a Mitten Ornament using 24 yards of Maxima, and a Braided Headband using approximately 70 yards of Maxima.

Using up your yarn leftovers can create room in your stash for the next sweater, blanket, or large shawl project, guilt-free. In the next few weeks, look for the publication of the Fairmount Fibers Fall 2017 pattern collection. We can’t wait to share them with you! Stay tuned to our social channels for announcements and details. 

 

Knitting Tips for the Trufa Shawl

Category: Featured Projects, Tutorial

Knitting Tips for the Trufa Shawl

Trufa, designed by Corrina Ferguson, is a crescent-shaped shawl knit with two skeins of Manos del Uruguay Serena. The body of the shawl is constructed with short rows followed by a lace section and a simple crochet edging. Here we would like to share our tips to help you master the techniques necessary to cast on and complete this beautiful design! 

Cast on for Trufa in Manos del Uruguay Serena

Casting On & Immediate Increases

Sometimes the trickiest part of the pattern is just getting started and set up. For this lace shawl tutorial, we begin with a long tail cast on. Here the key is to make it loose enough. We do not recommend using a larger needle size, as that will only make the stitches larger.  The goal is to leave some space between the stitches allowing room for the increases in the following row. To do this, give the strand over your thumb a little extra slack. 

Immediately the pattern calls for increasing the number of stitches by working a knit, a yarn over, and a second knit into the same stitch. Excluding the first and last stitch, each stitch after completing the increase is now 3 stitches, as seen in the images below. 

Cast-on for Trufa in Manos del Uruguay Serena

Short-Row Shaping

Short rows are exactly what they sound like: a row in which you do not knit all the stitches. To work a short row, you will stop at a specific point and turn your work to continue back across the stitches you just worked until you reach the next turning point. There are a variety of different types of short rows and ultimately they all achieve the effect of creating curves in your knitting. Here, the short row begins with a yarnover, knit or purl across to the yarnover from the previous row, work two stitches together (the yarnover from the previous row and the following stitch), work two more stitches, then you turn your work and repeat. 

Here, the short row is worked in three easy steps:

  1. Begin with a yarnover, then knit or purl across to the yarnover from the previous row.
  2. Work two stitches together (the yarnover from the previous row and the following stitch).
  3. Work two more stitches in pattern, then you turn your work and repeat.

After the first few short rows, you will notice that it looks like a bump is forming, but fear not! As you continue, that bump will smooth out and blocking will reveal the magic! 

Working short rows on Trufa

Lace Knitting 

The next step of the pattern is the lace charts. We strongly encourage the use of stitch markers to mark the pattern repeats. When you transition from chart A to B, and again from B to C, keep in mind that the placement of your markers will need to be adjusted to accommodate the number of stitches in the pattern repeat.

After your lace knitting is complete, and you have cast off, it’s blocking time! Check out our tutorial post, “How to block an all-over lace pattern”, for tips on how to block your finished project.

Trufa Lace detail

The Trufa pattern is available to purchase on Ravelry, or through your Local Yarn Shop that participates in the Ravelry In-Store Pattern program.

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Trufa Knitting Tips