Knitting Tips for the Trufa Shawl

Category: Featured Projects, Tutorial

Knitting Tips for the Trufa Shawl

Trufa, designed by Corrina Ferguson, is a crescent-shaped shawl knit with two skeins of Manos del Uruguay Serena. The body of the shawl is constructed with short rows followed by a lace section and a simple crochet edging. Here we would like to share our tips to help you master the techniques necessary to cast on and complete this beautiful design! 

Cast on for Trufa in Manos del Uruguay Serena

Casting On & Immediate Increases

Sometimes the trickiest part of the pattern is just getting started and set up. For this lace shawl tutorial, we begin with a long tail cast on. Here the key is to make it loose enough. We do not recommend using a larger needle size, as that will only make the stitches larger.  The goal is to leave some space between the stitches allowing room for the increases in the following row. To do this, give the strand over your thumb a little extra slack. 

Immediately the pattern calls for increasing the number of stitches by working a knit, a yarn over, and a second knit into the same stitch. Excluding the first and last stitch, each stitch after completing the increase is now 3 stitches, as seen in the images below. 

Cast-on for Trufa in Manos del Uruguay Serena

Short-Row Shaping

Short rows are exactly what they sound like: a row in which you do not knit all the stitches. To work a short row, you will stop at a specific point and turn your work to continue back across the stitches you just worked until you reach the next turning point. There are a variety of different types of short rows and ultimately they all achieve the effect of creating curves in your knitting. Here, the short row begins with a yarnover, knit or purl across to the yarnover from the previous row, work two stitches together (the yarnover from the previous row and the following stitch), work two more stitches, then you turn your work and repeat. 

Here, the short row is worked in three easy steps:

  1. Begin with a yarnover, then knit or purl across to the yarnover from the previous row.
  2. Work two stitches together (the yarnover from the previous row and the following stitch).
  3. Work two more stitches in pattern, then you turn your work and repeat.

After the first few short rows, you will notice that it looks like a bump is forming, but fear not! As you continue, that bump will smooth out and blocking will reveal the magic! 

Working short rows on Trufa

Lace Knitting 

The next step of the pattern is the lace charts. We strongly encourage the use of stitch markers to mark the pattern repeats. When you transition from chart A to B, and again from B to C, keep in mind that the placement of your markers will need to be adjusted to accommodate the number of stitches in the pattern repeat.

After your lace knitting is complete, and you have cast off, it’s blocking time! Check out our tutorial post, “How to block an all-over lace pattern”, for tips on how to block your finished project.

Trufa Lace detail

The Trufa pattern is available to purchase on Ravelry, or through your Local Yarn Shop that participates in the Ravelry In-Store Pattern program.

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Trufa Knitting Tips

 

How To Block an All-Over Lace Pattern

Category: Tutorial

When you knit a project with an all-over lace design, do you stop and call the project complete just as soon as the last stitch is bound off? No matter how simple or complex the lace is, taking the time to block the project can even out the fabric and spotlight the beauty of those intentional holes! We’ll show you how to block an all-over lace pattern using Fresa as an example. Fresa is a pattern designed by Christine Marie Chen in Manos del Uruguay Maxima

Why should you block?

Manos Maxima yarn knit into a Fresa Cowl

After you’ve selected your favorite Maxima colorway (shown here in Eucalyptus), wound it, knit it, bound off the stitches and woven in the ends, you probably have a project that looks like the one on the right. You can see the eyelet stripe pattern, but the lace is not crisp and the knit fabric is a bit uneven in some places. 

Materials Needed:

  • Your finished project
  • No-rinse wool wash
  • Towels
  • Blocking pins (T-Pins or Knit Blockers)
  • Sink or bowl
  • Water
  • Flat surface that can be left alone, like a table or floor

Before you block, take a bath!

Fresa Cowl soaked before blocking

There are several different methods to block your project. Blocking involves a bit of manipulation of the wool and that is successfully done when the wool is wet. Some knitters prefer to lay damp cloths on their project, others may lightly steam the work first. For the Fresa cowl, we choose to give it a good soak in the sink.

  • Begin by filling the sink with warm (tepid, not hot) water and a few drops of a no-rinse wool wash.
  • Place the cowl in the water, gently pushing down with your hands to submerge it and really get the water to soak into the fibers.
  • Allow the cowl time to sit and rest in the water. After 15 minutes or so, gently squeeze the water out. Do not wring the fabric; you could end up felting it! 

Next, you will need a flat surface to do the blocking. Ideally, this is a space that will not be disturbed while the project is drying: a spare table, a bed, or even the floor of another room all work well. Lay the cowl out on a few towels or blocking mats. Notice that the lace stitches in the cowl already look a bit nicer!

Stick it! Blocking begins…

Do not pin out every eyelet

Good news! Fresa has an all-over lace pattern, but you do NOT have to take a million straight pins and use them to block each eyelet open. You can save yourself a little bit of time using a set of Knit Blockers from Knitter’s Pride to block your project like so: 

Blocking the Fresa Cowl

Lay the cowl flat and even up the top and bottom edges. Place your Knit Blockers through both layers of fabric to align the top edges straight. (You can also use T-pins here, though it will take a little more time to pin the edges straight.)

Here’s a tip to avoid the cowl drying with a crease on each side: take a smaller microfiber or washcloth, roll it up lengthwise and place it inside the cowl at the edge. This will help the side edge dry on a curve, not a crease.

Next, pin the bottom edges as you did the top. That’s it! Leave the cowl to dry naturally, usually overnight or a day is long enough. When it is dry, remove the pins and cloths (if you used them), and snuggle in!

Finished Fresa

Taking the time to block your finished project will yield something you can wear with pride! If you follow these simple instructions, there is no need to be intimidated by this final step to finish your lacy knits with polish. You can do it! 

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How to Block an All-Over Lace pattern